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Company:

SandCat

 

The SandCat is a composite armored vehicle designed by the Israeli company  Plasan . The SandCat was shown publicly for the first time at AUSA arms fair in 2005. The latest models were shown for the first time at Eurosatory arms fair in 2018. The SandCat is based on a commercial Ford F-Series chassis. Approximately 700 SandCats have been produced since 2004, and while Plasan has never released complete details, these are known to be in service with at least 16 users across five continents, and in a wide variety of roles that range from Police/internal security to combat/patrol.

The SandCat can carry up to 11 people and serve for patrol and routine security missions. It weighs 8.5 tons with armor and people on board. Missiles and launchers can be added on; South Korea bought SandCats that it armed with weaponry from Rafael Advanced Defense Systems.

Plasan had developed the SandCat in 2005, neglected it to make armor for the U.S. army, then went back to it. Now it sells 12 upgraded versions.5

In 2020 Poland announced that Plasan’s Sandcat vehicle was selected in July 2015 in a tender conducted by the Security Department of the Military Police for the supply of light armored vehicles. In total, 14 were purchased: seven for combat, three for police coordination, one for medical evacuation.7

Plasan Sand Cat armored vehicle based on a shortened Ford F350 platform.

Use by Israeli forces:

 

In Israel the vehicle is called Caracal. In 2010 Plasan supplied the Israeli Police and border police with 80 Karakal (Sandcat) vehicles.[1]  The deal was estimated with a worth of $54 million.[2]  The SandCat vehicles are operational since then.

Palsan in cooperation with ELTA developed and supplied an upgraded version of the SandCat, named “Granit” for the Israeli military, which was used for intelligence and surveillance missions.[3]  In the same year the Israeli military conducted an operational trial of the Granit vehicles in Gaza, before taking the decision for an official purchase of the vehicles.[4]  Military resources reported that the “Granit” was also tried out by the Israeli army on the Lebanon border and in the West Bank.[5]  In 2012 Granit vehicles were operated by the Israeli military on the border with Egypt.[6]

SandCat

Plasan Sand Cat armored vehicle based on a shortened Ford F350 platform.

The SandCat is a composite armored vehicle designed by the Israeli company  Plasan . The SandCat was shown publicly for the first time at AUSA arms fair in 2005. The latest models were shown for the first time at Eurosatory arms fair in 2018. The SandCat is based on a commercial Ford F-Series chassis. Approximately 700 SandCats have been produced since 2004, and while Plasan has never released complete details, these are known to be in service with at least 16 users across five continents, and in a wide variety of roles that range from Police/internal security to combat/patrol.

The SandCat can carry up to 11 people and serve for patrol and routine security missions. It weighs 8.5 tons with armor and people on board. Missiles and launchers can be added on; South Korea bought SandCats that it armed with weaponry from Rafael Advanced Defense Systems.

Plasan had developed the SandCat in 2005, neglected it to make armor for the U.S. army, then went back to it. Now it sells 12 upgraded versions.5

In 2020 Poland announced that Plasan’s Sandcat vehicle was selected in July 2015 in a tender conducted by the Security Department of the Military Police for the supply of light armored vehicles. In total, 14 were purchased: seven for combat, three for police coordination, one for medical evacuation.7

In Israel the vehicle is called Caracal. In 2010 Plasan supplied the Israeli Police and border police with 80 Karakal (Sandcat) vehicles.[1]  The deal was estimated with a worth of $54 million.[2]  The SandCat vehicles are operational since then.

Palsan in cooperation with ELTA developed and supplied an upgraded version of the SandCat, named “Granit” for the Israeli military, which was used for intelligence and surveillance missions.[3]  In the same year the Israeli military conducted an operational trial of the Granit vehicles in Gaza, before taking the decision for an official purchase of the vehicles.[4]  Military resources reported that the “Granit” was also tried out by the Israeli army on the Lebanon border and in the West Bank.[5]  In 2012 Granit vehicles were operated by the Israeli military on the border with Egypt.[6]