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Arms Sold:

Orbiter UAV

Dominator UAV

Ranger UAV

Spike missile

Litening

C-MMR

Companies:

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Finland

Introduction:


Finland officially recognized Israel on 18 March 1949, and established official Diplomatic relations on November 14th 1950[1]. By the 1970’s, after Israel’s occupation of the West Bank, Gaza, Golan Heights and the Sinai, there was growing criticism of Israeli policies, including by Finnish heads of state[2]. While this criticism continues, this has not halted economic relations between the countries, and in 1992 as part of a trade agreement with EFTA countries, Israel and Finland signed a trade treaty, and today the same is true in relation to Israel’s trade agreements with the EU that Finland had since joined. In 1999 the two countries signed a bi-lateral tax-break agreement[3]. In 2015, the trade between the countries was 350 Million USD (both important and export)[4].

Military Relations:

 

Israeli-Finnish arms relations date back to the 1950’s when Israeli arms companies were manufacturing Finnish licenses artillery[5], but in the past two decades these relations have grown. In 2012 a military cooperation agreement was signed between the two countries, including a confidentiality clause on classified information in the fields of defense and security. This means that much of the military cooperation between the two countries is classified and not known to the public. 

In addition to the ongoing arms trade between the two countries, in 2019 SIBAT, the Israeli Ministry of Defense International Defense Cooperation Directorate, announced that Finland is one of six target markets for Israel’s arms export in the coming years[6].

Usage of Israeli Arms:

 

In 2009 and 2010, The European Border and Coast Guard Agency (Frontex) conducted workshops on “RPA and Land Border Surveillance” in Imatra, Finland. This workshop included live demonstrations of mini-RPAs including the Rafael Orbiter,[7] which Finland then purchased in 2012. While we do not know how these are used today by the Finish military, we do know that Finland is using drones to surveil its border with Russia, including to prevent immigration[8].

Human Rights Violations:

 

One of the most pressing Human Rights concerns in Finland today is the state’s treatment of refugees and immigrants. In 2018 Contrary to international standards, the authorities continued to detain unaccompanied children, and families with children, based on their immigration status. There was no time limit to detaining families with children. Family reunification remained difficult for most refugees due to both legislative and practical obstacles, including high income requirements. Despite international NGOs raising concern, Finland continued to forcibly return asylum-seekers whose applications were rejected to Afghanistan.

In addition to this, further in 2018 It enabled the acquisition of information on threats to national security by giving military and civilian intelligence agencies permission to conduct communications surveillance without any requirement for a link to a specific criminal offence[9].

Military service is still mandatory for all men, and alternative service in Finland is punitive (double the length of military service).

Sales Records Table:

Download as XLS or PDF or view the Google-Doc

Product
Company
Year
Deal Size
Comments
Source
Orbiter Tactical UAV
Aeronautics Defence Systems
2012
$30m
Link
Gabriel missiles
IAI
2019
$190m
Link
20mm High Explosive Multi-Purpose tank ammunition
2020
Link
advanced dismounted soldier systems
Elbit
2012
includes enhanced observation soldier equipment (MARS), comprehensive situation awareness software, cutting edge combat soldier wearable radio (PNR1000) and computer systems
Link

Finland

Finland officially recognized Israel on 18 March 1949, and established official Diplomatic relations on November 14th 1950[1]. By the 1970’s, after Israel’s occupation of the West Bank, Gaza, Golan Heights and the Sinai, there was growing criticism of Israeli policies, including by Finnish heads of state[2]. While this criticism continues, this has not halted economic relations between the countries, and in 1992 as part of a trade agreement with EFTA countries, Israel and Finland signed a trade treaty, and today the same is true in relation to Israel’s trade agreements with the EU that Finland had since joined. In 1999 the two countries signed a bi-lateral tax-break agreement[3]. In 2015, the trade between the countries was 350 Million USD (both important and export)[4].

Israeli-Finnish arms relations date back to the 1950’s when Israeli arms companies were manufacturing Finnish licenses artillery[5], but in the past two decades these relations have grown. In 2012 a military cooperation agreement was signed between the two countries, including a confidentiality clause on classified information in the fields of defence and securityy. This means that much of the military cooperation between the two countries is classified and not known to the public. 

In addition to the ongoing arms trade between the two countries, in 2019 SIBAT, the Israeli Ministry of Defense International Defense Cooperation Directorate, announced that Finland is one of six target markets for Israel’s arms export in the coming years[6].

In 2009 and 2010, The European Border and Coast Guard Agency (Frontex) conducted workshops on “RPA and Land Border Surveillance” in Imatra, Finland. This workshop included live demonstrations of mini-RPAs including the Rafael Orbiter,[7] which Finland then purchased in 2012. While we do not know how these are used today by the Finish military, we do know that Finland is using drones to surveil its border with Russia, including to prevent immigration[8].

One of the most pressing Human Rights concerns in Finland today is the state’s treatment of refugees and immigrants. In 2018 Contrary to international standards, the authorities continued to detain unaccompanied children, and families with children, based on their immigration status. There was no time limit to detaining families with children. Family reunification remained difficult for most refugees due to both legislative and practical obstacles, including high income requirements. Despite international NGOs raising concern, Finland continued to forcibly return asylum-seekers whose applications were rejected to Afghanistan.

In addition to this, further in 2018 It enabled the acquisition of information on threats to national security by giving military and civilian intelligence agencies permission to conduct communications surveillance without any requirement for a link to a specific criminal offence[9].

Military service is still mandatory for all men, and alternative service in Finland is punitive (double the length of military service).

Download as XLS or PDF or view the Google-Doc

Product
Company
Year
Deal Size
Comments
Source
Orbiter Tactical UAV
Aeronautics Defence Systems
2012
$30m
Link
Gabriel missiles
IAI
2019
$190m
Link
20mm High Explosive Multi-Purpose tank ammunition
Elbit
2020
Link
advanced dismounted soldier systems
Elbit
2012
includes enhanced observation soldier equipment (MARS), comprehensive situation awareness software, cutting edge combat soldier wearable radio (PNR1000) and computer systems
Link